I think Joseph Conrad captured the truth when he wrote, “Gossip is what no one claims to like—but everyone enjoys.” Gossip is a pervasive part of our culture and entertainment today (just look at the magazine covers), and Christians are not exempt from the influence. We love to revel in the juicy details of someone else’s drama, especially when we are privy to the news before everyone else. Even Scripture acknowledges how it entices, referring to words of a gossip as “choice morsels” (Proverbs 18:8). The lure, and the lie, is that engaging in such talk will actually satisfy us. Our curiosity about other people’s lives is normal - this is part of being human and doing life in community.  When people meet to catch up on the activities of mutual friends, the talk is not typically malicious . . . and sharing life in this way can actually be a sign of trust and intimacy.  Gathering information from others can even serve the benefit of informing people about their environment (expectations, boundaries, working norms, social cues, etc.). But even with “good intentions,” we can participate ignorantly in gossip . . . and as I discussed this topic with friends, I found out they too had a hard time deciphering their involvement. So how can we determine . . .